Board index Flathead Power-Technical Questions, Answers, and Suggestions Indians linkert m741

linkert m741

Post Fri Feb 07, 2014 4:58 am

Posts: 23
i have a 741 indian the linkert carb blows back a fine mist of fuel when you rev the bike i have changed the intake gasgets and tested checked the timing,adjusted the valves and cleaned the carb twice,we have also checked float level,does the carb blow back fuel because the air cleaner is off or is there another problem that we are missing? thanks jerry

Post Sat Feb 08, 2014 8:21 am

Posts: 3159
Location: Central Illinois, USA
Jerry!

It is always prudent to have the aircleaner installed as a flame arrestor.

Is it misting constantly, or spitting erratically?

Either way, manifold assemblies cannot always be trusted just because they are fresh. For certainty, please bubble-test as discussed at http://virtualindian.org/11techleaktest.html. It may save you a tail-chase.

Constant misting can be one or more conditions, such as poor ring seal, or a faulty camchest breather valve.
A more common cause can be too high of a fluid level within the carburetor bowl.
This results if the float is too heavy, such as when logged with fuel, or hanging up upon the bowlstem or side of the bowl. The position of the bowl is as important as the offset of the float within the bowl; It should be rotated to where the valve is quite close to the choke mechanism.

....Cotten

Post Sat Feb 08, 2014 9:12 am

Posts: 23
thanks cotten the misting happens as you rev the bike not at idel,the carb has a new brass float installed,i thought the level was correct.mabe i should try a composite float thanks for your help jerry

Post Sat Feb 08, 2014 9:56 am

Posts: 3159
Location: Central Illinois, USA
Jerry!

Brass floats weigh three to four times as much as the original cork and 'Armstrong' floats. By setting them quite deep, with some trial and error, you can make them work, but you will never get the performance of a light float.

Note that there are many mass-produced "composite" Linkert replacements on the market. One is just as heavy as the brass, and all suffer in select fuels: Some turn to jelly, and the rest are known to swell in size.

There is currently only one proven modern fuel-resistant ultralight material available, and floats must be carved from scratch.

....Cotten


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