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Wiedenhoff Magneto/starter/generator test bench

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Posts: 377
Location: madison wisconsin usa
electro geeks unite!

i would like to see the nameplate on the motor. that would confirm or deny the use of a general power supply. i still believe it would need one because it in all probability was connected to an A.C. source.

just a guess because i cannot quite make it out is that the gauge on the left of the motor is a tachometer. i can only make out "per" as in revolutions per min.

the large meters are westinghouse, you can see the logo above the display. must have been labeled for wiedenhoff. they are the same type and design as used in our oldest substations and power plants. almost always solid brass mounted on green or black marble, the later used bakelite for a backer. all of the control panels like this used large rubber mats to stand on, and you always operated it with ONE hand!

lucky dog chris!!

john
Last edited by john HD on Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Posts: 2688
Location: Los Angeles, CA
The instrument on the motor is a tachometer.
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Last edited by Chris Haynes on Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Posts: 1676
Location: Interlaken, NY USA

This jogged my memory about a switch board such as you describe John. The local hospital used to be a TB ward, so the powerplant was located some distance away. Now abandoned, I looked through building maybe 10 years ago and saw the large bakelite panels with some switchgear still mounted. Sadly, I don't think there were any meters left, vandals, you know.
Could that motor be a universal type motor, a brush motor capable of running on AC John? That was my guess. I'm thinking if so then the moving brush technique could still work for reversing direction. Also, an Universal motor would give you varying speeds too. Just a hunch,
DD


Posts: 2688
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Posts: 2688
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Posts: 2688
Location: Los Angeles, CA
john HD wrote:
electro geeks unite!

i would like to see the nameplate on the motor. that would confirm or deny the use of a general power supply. i still believe it would need one because it in all probability was connected to an A.C. source.john


This one?
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Posts: 1676
Location: Interlaken, NY USA

Thanks for more pics Chris;
Switch 1: used to change polarity of meters to suit direction motor is rotating. I don't think that it actually changes rotation direction, the mechanism under the rag does that.
Switch 2: ???? Not sure, Might change motor speed, more likely just adjusts meter readings, but really don't know.
Would not be a "Smoking Offence" (ie, causing smoke to arise from the item under test), to test operation of equipment in either position. Taking care to power down before changing switch position.
Switch 3: Connects/disconnects the voltage regulating coil located on the board
Switch 4: Connects/disconnects the cutout relay located on the board.
Switch 5: Sets board to match generator under test; 6volt or 12 volt.
Switch 6: Sets the ammeter scale to match the output of the generator under test. I don't believe you'd need the 0-500amp range for testing 32E's :lol: :lol:
Switch 7: ??? something to do with testing magnetos??
I guess the next thing to figure out is where you actually connect the generator test leads to the board. I'm presuming that's a patch bay for connections in the middle of the board to do that, but it's just a guess.
John, what do you think about powering the motor up, would it be just as simple as connecting the 2 leads from the motor to 120vac?
DD


Posts: 2688
Location: Los Angeles, CA
I have tried to turn the motor by hand. It won't budge. :cry:


Posts: 377
Location: madison wisconsin usa
yes i think it would be as simple as plugging it in.

i imagine it has 4 or 5 leads, just like a power transformer. leads 1 and 3 connected together and leads 2 and 4 connected for 120 volt operation. leads 3 and 4 connected as a mid point and leads 1 and 4 connected to line for 240 volt operation.

most devices this old were seldom set up for wye voltages. i think you could make it to run on 208 with a boost transformer if you had no other choice.

'cmon chris plug it in! :shock:

seriously i would do a little probing with an ohmeter to see what values were present before applying voltage. and then if i were to give it a try i would make sure the circuit had nothing bigger than a 15 amp breaker supplying it.

i ain't scared of a few sparks, but a big flash might scare a guy!

john


Posts: 377
Location: madison wisconsin usa
Chris Haynes wrote:
I have tried to turn the motor by hand. It won't budge. :cry:



a visit to a good old fashioned electric motor shop would fix that.

john


Posts: 2688
Location: Los Angeles, CA
john HD wrote:
seriously i would do a little probing with an ohmeter to see what values were present before applying voltage. and then if i were to give it a try i would make sure the circuit had nothing bigger than a 15 amp breaker supplying it.
john



You say that as if I had some idea of how to do it. :mrgreen:

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