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Cosmoline: An aquired taste

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Cotten

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Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Thu Mar 02, 2000 3:53 am

Cosmoline: An aquired taste

Cosmoline; An Aquired Taste

Oh Ho!,..ooooh,....uuuumm An NOS Sport Scout right case, and a tranny case with a clean layer of gel an eighth of an inch thick in places. One might suppose they are recently dipped and wrapped; the edges are so sharp as to cut you; the parkerized lifter guides washed in solvent to leave a white dustyiness to the point of stain.

I won't scrub the transmission case until I can sit with a snifter of brandy with it.

In fact, I think I'll try to melt the glazing off with a heat-gun so I can put it in a specimen bottle and lable it.

Authenticity: The new client attributes them to the Cheney Estate. It's a good thing I don't wear jewelry, or I'd hang the bottle on a chain around my neck.
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wifit

Posts: 39

Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2000 1:01 am

Location: SW NH USA

Post Thu Mar 02, 2000 6:00 am

I've recently been handling a bunch of NOS parts. Opening up 50 year old boxes is like Christmas morning when you're 8. I was glass beading my scout cases today. I found some cracks surrounding the outer edge of the drive side bearing housing. Later I went to VI and read what a fool I was glass beading them. I'm happy for you and green with envy.
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Cotten

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Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Thu Mar 02, 2000 2:26 pm

Don't feel so foolish! Glass beading is only a problem when cleaning is a problem. Although these NOS items won't need it, nearly every chunk of hardware that comes through my shop needs blasting if only for inspection. Mr. Tomas did not go in depth about various cleaning procedures because his article was aimed at the average enthusiast. And indeed rough blasting can damage delicate patinas and other "character points", but as far as damaging bearing surfaces, I might point out that Mr. Andrews once told me that his cams' finish was a result of an aluminum oxide and silica sand (!) blast. Many factors about embedding were not mentioned in the VI article, such as adequate pressure for beads to bounce instead of stick, the size of the bead, and surface preparation. Most damage comes from abrasives that are trapped in gum and carbon, not what is peened into the aluminum. In last month's VI Flywheel Workshop I described my methods in the Prep section. But note that beads can even come off of your clothing into a well cleaned assembly, as well as staples, earrings, cookie crumbs and cigarette ashes.
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wifit

Posts: 39

Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2000 1:01 am

Location: SW NH USA

Post Thu Mar 02, 2000 3:05 pm

So a fine glass bead at 75-90 lbs, run over my shafts won't hurt them and as long as they mic up I can re use them? Cotten could I mail you a few photos and questions?
Wifit
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Cotten

User avatar

Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Sat Mar 04, 2000 4:54 am

Its all a matter of cleanup afterwards; I like Adalox brushes, like I described at http://virtualindian.org/1techflywheel4.htm
and Scotchbrite with lotsa elbow grease is effective. On shafts that do not show spalling or wear I would still lightly cross-hatch them with 400 or finer Wet-or-Dry. I always try to answer personal posts; just identify any attachments!..Cotten

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