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oil

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mudbone

Posts: 88

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2000 12:01 am

Post Thu Nov 09, 2000 3:06 am

oil

i am by no means an oilologist but whats up with the mixed weight oils like 20w 50 or 10w 30? these oils advertise a thin viscosity start up then your motor heats up the 20w turns into 50w. what kinda shit is this!? we all know that oil thins as it gets hotter. i think they are selling the sluff of off the top of the tanks and calling this mixed weight miracle. i for one only use straight weights in any motor i own. but i have done a "visual touch and feel shop test" and it don't add up to me. truth or crap, any input? later.
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mudbone

Posts: 88

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2000 12:01 am

Post Fri Nov 10, 2000 12:57 am

thanks for the input fellows, still sounds like crap to me. i will stick to 50w in the motor and 50w in the tranny. evrything probaly works well. later
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mudbone

Posts: 88

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2000 12:01 am

Post Fri Nov 10, 2000 1:02 am

oh yeah, hey mike i didnt think 50w had the viscosity of axel grease,but i does not have the viscosity of water either. i run axel grease in my hubs but i dont run water in my motor.
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Boogiemanz1

Posts: 896

Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2000 1:01 am

Location: Bixby,OK, USA

Post Wed Nov 15, 2000 5:21 am

Rene, On the late model shovel and evo pumps, the lower end doesn't recieve any oil until the top end has full pressure, the valve then raises to uncover the hole thru the camcover to the pinion shaft (end oiling) which has a restrictor bushing in it to limit the amount of oil to the crank pin. Any higher pressure is bypassed into the gearcase or returned to the feed side of the pump. If you remove the the restriction in the pinion shaft, the lower end will flood and the excess may overcome the capacity of the return gears and be expelled thru the breather vent line. I use Jim's 180 degree crank pin which has two holes fore the rear rod located 180 degrees from the front rod hole. I do not believe the pinion hole is a timing factor on the early engines as much as the hole in the crankpin. Most 1940 up engines seem to get plenty of lube as not much is really required.IMHO

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Cotten

User avatar

Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Wed Nov 15, 2000 3:23 pm

I know it's a little late to get in this dialogue, but let me agree that everyone is making some very good points about the engineering of this beasts.
Back to fitting that critical pinion bushing:
Like Alex wrote, getting a sweet fit on a pre-cut bushing sometimes is more art than science. After fudging piloted reamers and even attempting to run piloting shoes on my Sunnen to do it through the right case, I have returned to a slightly undersized piloted reamer. After crosshatching this undersized bore with an Adalox (abrasive nylon) brush, I can try the shaft for fit. The 'high' marks left after a trial are then easily scraped with a $1.85 triangular machinist scraper, and re-finished with the Adalox again. It might take the patience of three or four touch ups, but this gives the maximum bearing surface at a minimum clearance. And I can do it to an assembled lower end. How else does one relieve the pucker from doweling cam bushings?
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Boogiemanz1

Posts: 896

Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2000 1:01 am

Location: Bixby,OK, USA

Post Thu Nov 16, 2000 4:55 am

Sorry Rene I misread your post.
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Cotten

User avatar

Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Thu Nov 16, 2000 2:52 pm

Alex! I'm confuzed agin. Are we talking different things with 'full-flow' and full-float'? What particular modification are you refering to? The pump swap, a bushing variation, or ??.
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Boogiemanz1

Posts: 896

Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2000 1:01 am

Location: Bixby,OK, USA

Post Sat Nov 18, 2000 5:43 pm

Rene, I use every bike I build as transportation. My purpose for visiting these sites is to pick up any tips or tricks that I can use to make my bike user friendly in a world of 75MPH highways.For myself I build to look as stock as possible, without sacrificing longivity. I'm sure that some true antique enthusiasts will not agree with my methods, but a 100 pt restoration means nothing to me personaly.I appreciate them, but would rather ride.

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mudbone

Posts: 88

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2000 12:01 am

Post Sat Nov 18, 2000 11:54 pm

right on!!! Boogiemanz1
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Fatdog Vintage Salvage

Posts: 753

Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2000 12:01 am

Post Sun Nov 19, 2000 3:44 am

Come on guys..... Play nice.
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Cotten

User avatar

Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Sun Nov 19, 2000 3:18 pm

I have to preach "correct" restoration to my customers constantly, but I sure don't practice it. (It's boring, and too damn expensive. And when you are done, is it "your" creation, or the glory of some dead industry?)
I'll defend anyone's right to booger anything they want to, particularly since most of the changes,such as Alex has suggested, are reversible or internal anyway. You don't preserve motorcycling by embalming motorcycles; you preserve motorcycling by bringing them to life and using them.
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mudbone

Posts: 88

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2000 12:01 am

Post Sun Nov 19, 2000 3:54 pm

right on Cotten!!!!
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Cotten

User avatar

Posts: 2676

Joined: Thu Sep 30, 1999 12:01 am

Location: Central Illinois, USA

Post Mon Nov 20, 2000 1:49 am

Right on for all of us!
We are preaching to the choir or whatever the phrase is, because we all are so close in our perspective that our only differences are in our wordplay. I luv fudges and improvements where appropriate, especially if it saves money and grief, but on the other hand, I had a customer (who doesn't get his hands dirty) pound his '47 EL from Chicago to the Davenport Meet, and then toured southern Wisconsin before heading home, all paced by two BMWs. And never even checked his oil (he used so little that I fear for his primary chain). The motor is overbored, but other wise VERY factory by design (but re-fitted by yours truly).
There is as much validity to "If it works, don't fix it" as there is to "Time marches on...."
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